Keeping safe in the water over summer

A recent study by the Royal Life Saving Society Australia (RLSSA) has revealed that older people make up one-third of drowning related deaths. During the period between 2002 and 2012 there were more than 1000 drownings involving people aged 50+, 36% of the total number of drownings.

Keeping safe in the water over summer

Keeping safe in the water over summer

Released: 02-Dec-2014

Event Date: to

Summer has arrived, and many of us will be making the most of the warmer weather by spending more time socialising with friends and spending time outdoors. For some of us, this means spending time swimming in the sea, or even in our backyard pools if we are lucky enough to have one. Unfortunately, many older swimmers do not take into account significant factors that put them at higher risk of drowning than their younger counterparts.

Particularly over the festive season, people will enjoy their lunch, perhaps with a few drinks, and follow it with a leisurely swim. It seems harmless enough, but alcohol consumption is impacting on the numbers of people aged 50+ who are drowning.

It is easy to think that swimming is a low impact form of exercise with little risk involved, but this is not necessarily the case for people with pre-existing health conditions. Health problems such as diabetes, heart conditions and arthritis can make swimming a far more dangerous activity than we realise. Fitness levels often decrease as we age, and this also needs to be considered before entering the water.

A recent study by the Royal Life Saving Society Australia (RLSSA) has revealed that older people make up one-third of drowning related deaths. During the period between 2002 and 2012 there were more than 1000 drownings involving people aged 50+, 36% of the total number of drownings.

So, should you be spending time swimming this summer, consider the risk reduction recommendations from the RLSSA which include wearing a life jacket, avoiding alcohol around water, keeping yourself hydrated, swimming between the flags and being aware of pre-existing medical conditions that might impact on your ability to swim confidently.

RLSSA have launched ‘The Talk’ – a campaign aimed at encouraging people to discuss the issue of water safety. Click here to find out what you can do to reduce the risk of drowning for yourself and others.

Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/new-campaign-to-prevent-drowning-deaths-in-older-people/story-e6frg6n6-1227134796133

All rights reserved COTA NSW © 2015

Site by Enjin